Immersion: Marine Archaeology Lessons Learned

Dr John Campbell

 

Athens-Clarke County Library

Appleton Auditorium

2025 Baxter Street

Athens, Georgia

706 613 3650 x343

Wednesday, June 22, 7:00 pm

For millennia, some ships spent the final part of their last voyage by traveling vertically. Their remains and cargo are a storehouse of history which give an insight into life in ancient times, including shipbuilding techniques and the life of a common sailor. Harbors and other features have slowly subsided underwater as land fell or water rose. Rugged coastlines and beaches have captured wayward whalers, trading vessels and large steamers. All have a story to tell.

Dr John Campbell is an amateur marine archaeologist who has examined underwater wrecks and other sunken features in France, Italy, Cyprus, Turkey, and New Zealand. The lessons learned from this field have been great lessons for life.

He is a retired physicist from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, the author of Historic Shipwrecks of the Chatham Islands, Rutherford Scientist Supreme, www.rutherford.org.nz, and the producer of the three-episode documentary Rutherford, the story of Ernest Rutherford, New Zealand’s preeminent nuclear scientist. Dr Campbell initiated and runs the Ask-A-Scientist program in New Zealand, and holds several awards for communicating science to the general public. One technique involves the art and science of fire walking, which he has staged four times at UGA where he is a frequent visitor.

 



Watch the video from our April 28 program Intimacy As We Age: Benefits and Challenges of Sexuality with Aging. Kate Morrissey Stahl works as a clinical social worker with individuals, couples, and families, and focuses her research on aging and sexual expression. She is working on her certification as a sex therapist with the American Association for Sex Educators, Counselors, and Therapists.

Contrary to popular culture, sex is not just for young people. Sexual relationships don't stop just because people get older; sex in later life may not be the same as it was in your youth—but that doesn’t have to be a bad thing. However, the aging process causes changes in the body that can affect intimacy in later years. Sexual intimacy among older Americans is a subject that people don't talk about much. The silence, say experts, allows misconceptions to flourish, and Kate Morrissey Stahl addresses concerns and dispels myths. -- including the widespread assumption that seniors lose interest in sex.

Oconee Hill Cemetery: A Hidden Athens Jewel

Charlotte Thomas Marshall

 Athens-Clarke County Library

Appleton Auditorium

2025 Baxter Street

Athens, Georgia

706 613 3650 x343

 Thursday, May 26, 7:00 pm

This month RSL welcomes back our friend Charlotte Thomas Marshall who will speak on one of her favorite topics: Oconee Hill Cemetery. Charlotte was the first woman to serve as a trustee of Oconee Hill Cemetery and is a founding member of the Friends of Oconee Hill Cemetery. She is the author of the book Oconee Hill Cemetery of Athens, Georgia, Volume 1 and is presently working on the three concluding volumes. Mrs. Marshall has written or edited five other books on Athens history and genealogy, including the recent The Tangible Past in Athens, Georgia, the recipient of the Georgia Historical Records Advisory Council’s Award for Excellence in Documenting Georgia’s History. She has given walking tours of the cemetery for over 45 years, but this month she will be bringing her tour to the library auditorium by giving a slide talk.

Oconee Hill Cemetery opened in 1856. It was designed by James Camak as a Victorian natural landscape, or park-like, cemetery.  Originally 17 acres, it has grown over the years to almost 100 acres, and is filled with beautiful tombstones and mausoleums marking graves with familiar names such as Cobb, Lumpkin, Church, Hill, Hodgson, and many others. Oconee Hill is the final resting place of UGA Presidents, Confederate Generals, governors, senators, cabinet members, musicians and the many talented people who made Athens the special place it has become over the past 200 years.